Lugs and Lug-Width: Watch Terms You Should Know – Part 1

Wristwatch lugs and lug-width for watch straps and springbars

Wristwatch lugs and lug-width for watch straps and springbars

As you venture into establishing a watch collection and a relationship with an Authorized Dealer or trusted online watch seller, you should start to familiarize yourself with some of the terms that make up the parts of your watches. The first installment of Watch Terms You Should Know is a very simple, but often used term that comes up in conversation amongst collectors: Lugs, lug-width, interhorn, or horns – all will be mentioned from time to time.

It is the 12:00 and 6:00 part of the watch where the strap and/or bracelet is attached, and typically has two extended portions on each side. The inner area of the lugs will have holes drilled internally so shouldered spring bars can be placed in position. Pierced lugs, or lug holes, are when the inner springbar holes are drilled all the way through. This style of lug is sometimes preferred for ease of strap removable, but does not offer an atheistic advantage to non-pierced lugs. Lugs can be decorated or plain. They can be brushed, polished, long, short, mobile or not.

How to measure lug width

When you go to order a new strap, or if your spring bar snaps, you’re going to need to know the lug width of your watch. The lug-width or inter-horn is the space between them. This varies greatly in millimeter, and yes we use millimeter never inches or the imperial route in this game. The best way to get this measurement is with a caliper. The most common sizes range from 18mm up to 24mm give or take.

Like I said it’s simple, but terminology goes back and fourth between horns, lugs, etc. Now you are a bit smarter and know what to call those things that keep your watch bracelet in place. You will sound well-informed when getting your band replaced instead of referring to them as pointy extensions. Part 2 of the series will be Crystals and how they play a part in the price and durability of your timepiece.

Wristwatch lugs and lug-width for watch straps and springbars

Wristwatch lugs and lug-width for watch straps and springbars

Wristwatch lugs and lug-width for watch straps and springbars

Wristwatch lugs and lug-width for watch straps and springbars

2 thoughts on “Lugs and Lug-Width: Watch Terms You Should Know – Part 1

  1. Chad P. Rickicki: Your description, and illustrations, on the Internet, of wristwatch lugs are informative and helped me grasp the content of a recent article in the latest Watch & Clock Bulletin (May, June, 2017). My reason for comment is to note some grammar errors in your internet article. My tablet doesn’t have printing capability; so, I can’t cite the errors in this message. One error that I recall is in your definition of a lug as “when . . . . “. The word “when” is an ADVERB, not a noun. There are some more grammar errors. I suggest that you have an English-fluent staff member at Tag-Heuer make recommendations on drafts of your future articles. Now I hope that you are not irritated. Jim Sturm (watch collector-repairer)

    1. It’s the internet. Things don’t have to be perfect as long as they get the idea across. Stop being a grammar police and just enjoy the post. Thanks Chad for teaching the world about lugs and most especially interfuckinghorn.

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